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Myanmar: From growth hotspot to civil war

Myanmar: From growth hotspot to civil war

Myanmar’s two largest cities – Yangon and Mandalay – were reportedly a vision of uncharacteristic emptiness earlier this week as the public apparently defied the threats of the military junta and stayed at home in an act of peaceful protest. Myanmar has been under military control since February 2021. What began as political warfare has descended into a humanitarian crisis – a crisis that also comes with significant economic consequences.

There’s no escaping the impact of seemingly uninhabited towns and cities. It somehow jars with the construct of human civilisation that we have evolved over centuries; it strikes an unsettling chord that resonates.

Such desolate streets have also been the sight emanating from Myanmar this week, as the country marked one year since the military coups that increasingly threaten to define it. A ‘silent strike’ reportedly saw streets deserted and shops abandoned across many of the country’s towns and cities on Monday (31st January), on the eve of the coup’s first anniversary.

Myanmar’s two largest cities – Yangon and Mandalay – were reportedly a vision of uncharacteristic emptiness as the public apparently defied the threats of the military junta and stayed at home in an act of peaceful protest.

What began as political warfare has descended into a humanitarian crisis – a crisis that also comes with significant economic consequences.

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